GREATER  WEMP  BARN      ALBANY,   NEW YORK
   
       
       
   

 

Dutch barns have the spiritual quality of a cathedral in the wilderness.


   
   

 Indeed both derive from the same source - the medieval cloister barn - three aisles, high loft, and symmetrical entrances in gable ends for wagon and animals.


VERPLANK  BARN  AT  MOUNT  GULIAN
HISTORIC  SITE
   
     


VERPLANK  BARN 
   

 

 

 

 

   

Early Dutch farms were primarily crop farms with domestic animals sufficient for family needs.


Tenon

Farms were scattered over the landscape, often far from towns, so each needed
to be self sufficient.

Slaves were common.

     
     
          
 

Wheat, a staple commercial crop throughout the Hudson Valley, was off loaded from
wagons onto the loft above where it dried before being brought to the floor for threshing.

By opening doors at either end of the spacious central aisle, passing wind aided in winnowing.
The grain was then bagged and taken to the mill or sent to market, usually in New York City.

In the side aisles, accessed by corner doors, were cows, horses and sometimes sheep, enough for
domestic needs.
            --Roderic H. Blackburn  
   

THE DUTCH BARN PRESERVATION SOCIETY
Dedicated to the study and Preservation of
New World Dutch Barns

 Nillsen  Barn at
Mabee Farm

 New World Dutch Barn
Survey 2000

 


 
   

 

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